About this website

The aim of this website is to bring together the freely available online resources related to John Hattie’s Visible Learning research (videos, research papers, books and news articles) and to enable a deeper understanding of the underlying concepts. Disclaimer: This website is an independent web project and not in any way affiliated with John Hattie’s professional development program “Visible Learning Plus”. 

Visible Learning was introduced by John Hattie in his groundbreaking meta study Visible Learning (2009). Hattie compared effect sizes of many aspects that influence learning outcomes. Hattie points out that in education most things work. The questions is which ones work best and where to concentrate our efforts.

When John Hattie’s first book Visible Learning was published in 2009 the Times Educational Supplement talked of nothing less than the “holy grail of education“. For an interview with John Hattie in 2012 TES titled “He’s not the messiah… but for many policymakers he comes close.” At least since he has published his follow up Visible Learning for Teachers (2012) that focuses on the underlying story behind the data. One of the main aspects of Visible Learning is a new understanding of the enhanced role of teachers: Teachers are most successful when they become evaluators of their own teaching.

During my own work with schools in Germany and the research for a book about students feedback I noticed that most teachers are highly interested to learn about “what works best in education” based on facts from the Visible Learning study. However, it is also a huge challenge for teachers, head teachers or school districts to bring Visible Learning aspects and a new role of teachers into the classroom. The question teachers asked most was: Where to start?

This website is aimed to help decide this question for your own school and share your experiences with other teachers. It provides useful background information that helps to bring the research into action. It is your impact on your students in your school.

Focus is crucial, so keep it simple! Take one aspect amongst the most powerful influences for students’ achievement that fits best to your current classroom or school.

If you have any questions or remarks about Visible Learning please contact us or leave a comment. If you want to share your own experiences with Visible Learning in your school with other teachers please send us an Email and we will publish your Visible Learning experience on this website. I am looking forward to hearing from you!

Sebastian Waack (CV)

6 comments on “About this website
  1. Heino Schonfeld says:

    Dear colleagues,
    From your website:
    “The Indipendent: John Hattie talks about British schools”
    Spot the spelling mistake?
    I thought that was funny…
    Best,
    Heino

  2. Book “Visible Learning.A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement” p. 62:

    “Hart and Risley (1995) showed that when students from lower SES groups start school, they have, on average, spoken about 2.5 million words, whereas those from higher groups have spoken 4.5 million words.”

    Really? It is not funny :)
    Hope, John Hattie is more accurate with other figures in the book.

    • gregor says:

      i cannot follow, please explain.

      the 2,5 million words are, as i understand the figure, the sum total of all words uttered. it is not the size of their vocab, i would think.

      one would have to find out what the school starting age is. let’s assume 5. then that would mean 3 1/2 yrs of speaking, or 1200 days. makes an average of 2000 words per day for the children from lower socioeconomic status groups, almost the double for those of higher status.

      sounds possible to me.

    • Sebastian Waack says:

      @Tamara: Here is a link to a short summary of Hart and Risley (1995) “Meaningful differences”. You can get the book here on Amazon.
      @ Gregor: Thanks for clarifying this point!

  3. Mike Bell says:

    Hi, thanks for this great website.

    Under ‘Piagetian programs’ you rightly state that the correlation is between assessment by piagetian methods and conventional assessment. However, you give the impression that ‘piagetian methods’ are an effective method of teaching with your explanation of the ‘stages’ and the sentence:”Example for Piagetian programs: Focus on the thinking processes rather than the outcomes and do not impose the adult thinking process on to children.”
    The entry in hattie’s table refers only to the assessment correlation, not the effectiveness of that type of teaching.
    (Please correct me if I am wrong!)

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  1. [...] of the Melbourne Education Research Institute at the University of Melbourne, Australia, is best known as the author of Visible Learning, which is regarded as something of a bible on which teaching practices work [...]

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About Visible Learning
Visible Learning means an enhanced role for teachers as they become evaluators of their own teaching. Visible Teaching and Learning occurs when teachers see learning through the eyes of students and help them become their own teachers.
Further reading
Weblinks


Visible Learning plus is a professional development programme for teachers. It provides an in-depth review and change model for schools based on John Hattie's research. With a seminar and support series the Visible Learning plus team helps schools to find out about the impact they are having on student achievement. www.visiblelearningplus.com