Feedback in schools by John Hattie

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Feedback is one of the top 10 influences on student achievement. John Hattie’s research has focused on feedback for a long time.

In 2011 John Hattie contributed to a publication by Sutton, Hornsey & Douglas about Feedback: The communication of praise, criticism, and advice with an article about ‘Feedback in schools’.

This short text is definitely a must-read for everybody trying to learn more about the feedback model behind the Visible Learning research. John Hattie provides some interesting clarifications and explanations to his previous articles about feedback in schools:

  1. Giving is not receiving: Teachers may claim they give much feedback, but the more appropriate measure is the nature of feedback received (and this is often quite little).
  2. The culture of the student can influence the feedback effects: Feedback is not only differentially given but also differentially received.
  3. Disconfirmation is more powerful than confirmation: When feedback is provided that disconfirms then there can be greater change, provided it is accepted.
  4. Errors need to be welcomed: The exposure to errors in a safe environment can lead to higher performance
  5. The power of peers: Interventions that aim to foster correct peer feedback are needed.
  6. Feedback from assessment: Assessment (…) could and should also provide feedback to teachers about their methods.
  7. There are many strategies to maximize the power of feedback: Shute (2008) provided nine guidelines for using feedback to enhance learning:
    • focus feedback on the task not the learner,
    • provide elaborated feedback,
    • present elaborated feedback in manageable units,
    • be specific and clear with feedback messages,
    • keep feedback as simple as possible but no simpler,
    • reduce uncertainty between performance and goals,
    • give unbiased, objective feedback, written or via computer,
    • promote a learning goal orientation via feedback,
    • provide feedback after learners have attempted a solution.

(cf. John Hattie in Sutton, Hornsey,  & Douglas (2011), Feedback: The communication of praise, criticism, and advice.)

You can buy the book on Amazon.com or on Amazon.co.uk: Sutton, Hornsey & Douglas(2011): Feedback: The communication of praise, criticism, and advice.

You can download the article Feedback in schools by John Hattie from visiblelearningplus.com

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Posted in Books, Books in English, Feedback, Visible Learning
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7 other websites write about for "Feedback in schools by John Hattie"
  1. […] In an article for a book about feedback John Hattie provides some interesting clarifications and explanations to research about 'Feedback in schools'.  […]

  2. […] Feedback in Schools – Feedback falls in the top 10 most influential factors on a child’s achievement, according to the research of John Hattie. Check out this article for some more thoughts on the feedback we as educators give to our students. […]

  3. […] Visible Learning: Feedback in schools by John Hattie Educational Leadership [Takeaways]: 7 Things to Remember about Feedback As the coaches have been studying the instructional practice of “monitoring learning and providing descriptive feedback to and among students,” I’ve learned that feedback is an area in which we can grow as educators. It’s very powerful when given accurately, but — like many teachers — I’ve often given praise or a score (rather than true feedback).  […]

  4. […] every word that is written and then, getting students to respond to it. We can probably thank Hattie, the Sutton Trust and OFSTED reports for this. Thanks guys, you have increased our workload […]

  5. […] Metaanálisis de John Hattie en la enseñanza eficaz y más precisamente retroalimentación , lo tenemos […]

  6. […] In an article for a book about feedback John Hattie provides some interesting clarifications and explanations to research about 'Feedback in schools'.  […]

  7. […] combining feedback that is timely, accurate, and specific (Hattie’s research) and grounding it with deliberate practice you create a rich breeding ground to increase fluency […]

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Visible Learning means an enhanced role for teachers as they become evaluators of their own teaching. Visible Teaching and Learning occurs when teachers see learning through the eyes of students and help them become their own teachers.
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Visible Learning plus is a professional development programme for teachers. It provides an in-depth review and change model for schools based on John Hattie's research. With a seminar and support series the Visible Learning plus team helps schools to find out about the impact they are having on student achievement. www.visiblelearningplus.com