Hattie Ranking: Influences And Effect Sizes Related To Student Achievement

John Hattie developed a way of ranking various influences in different meta-analyses according to their effect sizes. In his ground-breaking study “Visible Learning” he ranked those influences which are related to learning outcomes from very positive effects to very negative effects on student achievement. Hattie found that the average effect size of all the interventions he studied was 0.40. Therefore he decided to judge the success of influences relative to this ‘hinge point’, in order to find an answer to the question “What works best in education?”

Hattie studied six areas that contribute to learning: the student, the home, the school, the curricula, the teacher, and teaching and learning approaches. But Hattie did not merely provide a list of the relative effects of the different influences on student achievement. He also tells the story underlying the data. He found that the key to making a difference was making teaching and learning visible. He further explained this story in his book “Visible learning for teachers“.

Here is an overview of the Hattie effect size list that contains 138 influences and effect sizes across all areas related to student achievement. The list visualized here is related to Hattie (2009) Visible Learning. Hattie constantly updates this list with more meta studies. You can find an updated version in Hattie (2011) Visible Learning for Teachers.

 

 

Hattie ranking: Influences and effect sizes related to student achievement (Hattie-Rangliste)

 

8 comments on “Hattie Ranking: Influences And Effect Sizes Related To Student Achievement
  1. Tom Barrett says:

    Hi there – thanks for sharing the graphic – not sure if someone has already pointed out to you the error. You have “Classroom Behavioural” with an effect size of 0.8

    I was looking for Classroom Discussion and assume you must have got those mixed up. Classroom Behavioural has an effect size of only 0.62.

    Hope this helps with a revision of the graphic – cheers

    • Sebastian Waack says:

      Hi Tom,
      Thanks for pointing that out! I double checked the issue with Hattie’s two books about “Visible Learning”.
      The list I visualized for this website is related to Hattie (2009) Visible Learning.
      Hattie constantly updates his list with more meta studies. I suggest that your comment relates to an updated list in Hattie (2011) Visible Learning for Teachers?
      Cheers, Sebastian

      • Clare says:

        Can someone help me please? I have seen many different tables of Hattie’s effect sizes and the order and effect size seems to differ quite significantly between them. Why is this? I am trying to use them for an evaluative model and I am confused as to which order and effect size I should use.

        With thanks for any clarification you can offer.

        • Sebastian Waack says:

          Hi Clare,
          As Hattie has updated the ranking in his newer books I would recommend to use the latest version of the list in “Visible Learning for Teachers” which cites over 900 meta studies.

  2. Matt Lottes says:

    Hi,

    I’ve been reading a book called Spark, by John Ratey. In it, he argues that cardio exercise has a large influence on student success. Does anyone know where this might fit into Hattie’s effects, or any related studies?

  3. Graeme Miller says:

    I note that peer tutoring has a 0.55 effect but mentoring which Hattie states is a form of peer tutoring has a 0.15 effect. How can there be this level of difference? One could assume from this that mentoring is not a particularly worthwhile investment but there would be few people who have achieved eminence in their fields who were not heavily influenced by a mentor.

  4. Daniel Reeders says:

    Hello, I am about to buy the book but I wondered if someone could just quickly fill me in here on what statistic is being used to represent the effect size, e.g. r or r^2 or z? Thanks.

    • Sebastian Waack says:

      Hello Daniel,
      Hattie uses Cohen’s d to represent the effect size. Cohen’s d is defined as the difference between two means divided by a standard deviation of the pooled groups or of the control group alone.
      Cheers, Sebastian

40 Pings/Trackbacks for "Hattie Ranking: Influences And Effect Sizes Related To Student Achievement"
  1. [...] can see the full rankings here, with the teaching effects separated out here. If you haven’t seen this data already, you [...]

  2. [...] of this articulation is worthless unless it has a positive impact on student learning. According to Hattie’s Visible Learning meta-analyses, integrated curriculum has an impact of only d=0.39 (average). However, professional development [...]

  3. [...] Hattie Ranking: Influences And Effect Sizes Related To Student Achievement | VISIBLE LEARNING [...]

  4. [...] Öğrenme metotlarının etki büyüklüğüne göre sıralaması [...]

  5. [...] is the decisive factor in child development – all of the evidence, from PISA to meta-studies by the likes of John Hattie, points this way. Yet, as Claxton et al. point out, instead of “pursuing an enlightened approach [...]

  6. [...] maintain ‘standards’ (and as a result, open inquiry as curriculum ranks pretty low on Hattie’s impacts). However, if we focus only on the content, insisting that to be successful all students must meet [...]

  7. [...] what does Hattie’s meta-analysis say about feedback, micro-teaching, formative evaluation, etc? They are amongst the top approaches [...]

  8. [...] process more compelling Providing environments/ opportunity for ongoing learning Crucial – effect sizes Challenge: staff development days Building common understandings More considered thinking, [...]

  9. [...] to Hattie, feedback is one of the top 10 influences on student [...]

  10. [...] Hattie effect size list of 138 influences across all areas related to student achievement.  [...]

  11. [...] 138 Influences Related To Achievement – Hattie effect size list [...]

  12. [...] The work of John Hattie (above) suggests that feedback (with an effect size of 0.73) is well within ‘the zone of desired effects’ i.e. it makes a significant difference to student learning.  If you want to read more about Hattie’s work and ‘effect sizes’ there is more on this here. [...]

  13. [...] metastudie av metastudiene – Visible Learning rangerer for eksempel ”teacher training” og ”teacher subject matter knowledge” nær bunnen [...]

  14. [...] savoir davantage sur ses travaux et j’ai été particulièrement impressionné par le « Hattie Ranking », une façon de classifier les différentes influences selon leur niveau [...]

  15. [...] smaller studies and tried to answer one question: what works in education? Hattie came up with a list of things that drive students’ performance. Turns out that a bunch of them are ultimately [...]

  16. [...] werden und ergeben so das ‘Hattie-Ranking’. Alle Effektstärken haben einprägsame (englische) Bezeichnungen – das macht es jedoch auch notwendig, genauer hinzusehen, da [...]

  17. [...] article here where you will find an overview of the Hattie effect size list that contains 138 influences and [...]

  18. [...] that work, but a measured accounting of which of these work significantly better than most. Among the top ten, at the far end of the statistical curve, feedback – meaning feedback to the teacher – appears. [...]

  19. [...] we were surprised to discover that ‘students own expectations’ ranked number one on Hattie’s 138 influences relating to achievement. As future educators it is important for us to first understand what this means for our students [...]

  20. [...] de lues, je n’allais pas ajouter Hattie à la liste… Cela dit, j’étais fort intriguée par l’échelle des 138 influences reliées aux réussites des élèves. En effet, cette nomenclature m’apparaissait s’inscrire dans la recherche de concepts-clés [...]

  21. [...] Hattie Ranking: Influences and Effect Sizes Related To Student Achievement [...]

  22. [...] one the most powerful things teachers can provide for students in classrooms is formative feedback. John Hattie’s meta-analysis of educational research places feedback at the top of the instructional hierarchy (0.73 effect size [...]

  23. [...] also ridiculous. Some of the most effective teacher-influenced instructional strategies included in John Hattie’s research would suggest that “discovering” concepts isn’t always the best way to go. [...]

  24. [...] of 15 years’ work. The effect sizes Hattie found for various educational factors are ranked here. Kirschner, Sweller and Clark’s 2006 paper Why Minimal Guidance During Instruction Does Not [...]

  25. [...] instruction, providing quality feedback to teachers, focusing our efforts on strategies that work (Hattie’s work), sustaining this improvement work over time (years), ensuring the parents are informed and [...]

  26. [...] is formative assessment important? John Hattie’s work Visible Learning details 138 factors that influence student learning, and among them, formative assessment, or “formative evaluation” as he terms it, has [...]

  27. [...] an analysis of over 800 meta-analyses of classroom strategies, Dr. John Hattie identifies over 130 factors that yield learning results.  Looking at his list, the most effective factors involve the kind of structure and feedback the [...]

  28. [...] John Hattie’s research and the effect sizes. (10 [...]

  29. [...] then compared the research from John Hattie and the Sutton Report, noting that in both reports Digital Technology was not even in the top ten [...]

  30. [...] Nobody wants to be that teacher – the one who assigns a massive packet of busy work, due the first day back to school, but it is evident that extended vacations result in a reversal of some learning.  This loss of learning increases with grade level, so at the ages we are trying to maximise the use of high-impact teaching and learning strategies, we run the risk of much of that work being undone by Summertime Subsidence (d=-0.02). [...]

  31. [...] then compared the research from John Hattie and the Sutton Report, noting that in both reports Digital Technology was not even in the top ten [...]

  32. [...] A: The excellent John Hattie has developed the 138 achievement influencers. Hattie ranked these influencers according to their learning outcome effect size. The average [...]

  33. [...] the 138 learning influencers from the six areas that contribute to learning (student, home, school, curricula, teacher, teaching [...]

  34. [...] This is sound theory and although negative beliefs about disadvantaged students may be subconscious, they are still incredibly damaging to students’ self-concept and their outcomes. In addition, Hattie’s Visible Learning notes that the teacher-student relationship is a significant factor in student achievement, with an effect size of… [...]

  35. [...] jaar een artikel, naar aanleiding van de Learning Tomorrow week. Hij refereert in dit stuk aan de meta-studie van John Hattie en stelt dat docenten onvoldoende geëquipeerd zijn om te bepalen wat wel of niet effectief is. [...]

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About Visible Learning
Visible Learning means an enhanced role for teachers as they become evaluators of their own teaching. Visible Teaching and Learning occurs when teachers see learning through the eyes of students and help them become their own teachers.
Further reading
Weblinks


Visible Learning plus is a professional development programme for teachers. It provides an in-depth review and change model for schools based on John Hattie's research. With a seminar and support series the Visible Learning plus team helps schools to find out about the impact they are having on student achievement. www.visiblelearningplus.com